Lindsey Liebig

Herald Fire Protection District (HFPD) director Lindsey Liebig has won a seat on the Sacramento Local Agency Formation Commission (LAFCo). Liebig won the plurality of votes cast by special districts within Sacramento County and, therefore, will represent over 100 special districts on the commission.

Liebig has been on the board of HFPD since being appointed in 2015 after De Carson stepped down from the position. Liebig, along with two fellow board members, ran unopposed in 2016, keeping her seat at the HFPD table. She is the current chair for HFPD.

Liebig has lived in Herald for more than 20 years and attended both Arcohe Elementary School and Galt High School, graduating in 2003.

After high school, Liebig attended Cal Poly San Luis Obispo where she received her bachelor’s in agribusiness with a concentration in wine and viticulture, and fair and facility management.

Liebig is the executive director of the Sacramento County Farm Bureau, where she is responsible for managing day-to-day operations, such as legislative advocacy, membership and county events.

Liebig will join Sacramento County supervisors Sue Frost and Susan Peters; two representatives from Sacramento County cities, Sarah Aquino of Folsom and Angelique Ashby of the City of Sacramento; another special district representative, Gay Jones of Sac Metro Fire Department and public at large member Chris Little to form the seven member commission.

Sacramento County LAFCo governs over boundary changes, including annexations of cities and special districts, the formation of new agencies, incorporation of new cities and districts, consolidation or reorganization of special district and/or cities, municipal service reviews and sphere of influence updates.

According to its website, LAFCo’s goals “are to ensure the orderly formation of local governmental agencies, to preserve agricultural and open space lands, and to discourage urban sprawl.

LAFCos are state-mandated quasi-judicial countywide commissions, originally put in place soon after World War II. After the war, California experienced a massive population explosion, which, according to the website, resulted in sporadic formation of cities and special districts.

“Premature and unplanned development created inefficient, expensive systems of delivering public services using various small units of local government,” the website reads.

Then governor Edmund G. Brown Sr. appointed a commission to analyze the growing problem and, eventually in 1963, mandated the formation of LAFCos in each county in California.

Besides Sacramento County Supervisor Don Nottoli, the last time someone from the Galt area served as a LAFCo commissioner was in 2014 when then Galt Vice Mayor Mike Singleton served as the commission’s chair.