Pliney ‘Frank’ Everett

Pliney “Frank” Everett, 86, passed away in his Galt home on June 2, 2019 after a lengthy illness. He was born during the Great Depression on March 19, 1933 to Sherman Lester and Lilly Belle Everett who made their home in Pottawatomie County, Oklahoma near the small town of Wanette.

Frank and his wife Oleta Everett were longtime residents of the Galt area. He owned the Park Woods Barber Shop until his retirement and was twice named Business Man of the Year in the City of Stockton where he worked for decades. He and his wife attended the Stockton Church of Christ where they were devoted members.

Frank was the last surviving member of his family. His parents, brother Sherman Edward Everett and sisters Christine Kime and Zereda Magby preceded him in death.

Surviving him are his wife of 64 years, Oleta; daughter Karen Everett Watson; grandchildren Isaac Richard Watson, Tara Marie Anzelone and Travis Watson, and 10 great-grandchildren. His legacy extends to his son-in-law Ron Watson, grandson-in-law Brian Anzelone and granddaughter-in-law Melissa Watson.

Frank was raised on his parents’ 160 acres where he worked alongside his father and his brother to raise crops, gardens and livestock. He loved sports and excelled in basketball and baseball. He met Oleta Marie Mann from the small town of Konawa, Oklahoma in the very early 1950s and was devoted to her ever since. They loved going to his baseball games and to dances in the area where now famous singers and musicians got their start.

He left his home in Oklahoma to find work in California. Once he found work, Oleta got on a bus and left home, having never been out of the state of Oklahoma. They married just days after she arrived in California at the home of Frank’s sister in Napa.

Their next stop in California was to Wilmington where Frank found work at the Borax Plant in Long Beach as a boiler room operator. His brother-in-law William McCollum not only found Frank work but three other brothers-in-law also. The young couple were still in their early 20s when they bought their first home in Wilmington. A number of Oleta’s younger brothers came to live with them while finding jobs and getting on their feet.

After their daughter Karen was born in 1956, Frank began working on his Barber license while holding down his full-time job. Once he finished his training, the family moved to Sacramento where he worked at the South Gate Barber Shop for a number of years. The family moved to Elk Grove and, with Oleta and Frank’s hard work, fixed up homes, built a new home and were able to buy the Park Woods Barber Shop on Hammer Lane in Stockton and a home in Lodi. After he retired, he sold the shop to his son-in-law Ron Watson who ran the shop until his own retirement.

Frank was always helping whenever he could. Many times he went to clients’ homes that were too sick to come into the shop. He also visited rest homes and retirement villages to give haircuts.

While their grandchildren were still young, Frank and Oleta moved to the Galt area to be closer to their daughter and grandkids. They built a dream home on two acres and worked tirelessly to turn two bare acres into a beautiful place to live. They both loved working outside and were always improving their home. Both continued to help out their daughter and her growing family. They were always willing to sacrifice for their family.

Just a few weeks before his death, he was asked what advice he had for the younger family members. He said to love God, always be honest, and love and care for family.

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